Two New Books by Beale

February 22, 2015

Revelation: A Shorter Commentary and An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek

Rev. Dr. Gregory Beale, J. Gresham Machen Chair of New Testament, has co-authored two more books: Revelation: A Shorter Commentary, co-authored with David Campbell; and An Interpetive Lexicon of New Testament Greek, co-authored with Daniel Brendsel and William Ross (M.Div. '14)

Both are now available at Westminster Bookstore.

RevelationRevelation: A Shorter Commentary

By G.K. Beale and David Campbell

Publisher's Description: Providing many erudite insights into John's often perplexing apocalyptic vision, G. K. Beale's monumental New International Greek Testament Commentary volume on Revelation has been highly praised since its publication in 1999. This shorter commentary distills the superb grammatical analysis and exegesis from that tome (over 1,300 pages) into a book more accessible for pastors, students, and Christians in general. Preserving the essential content and argument from each chapter in revised form, Beale discusses Revelation verse by verse, drawing out the book's profound truths and encouragements concerning Christian life and discipleship. Following each commentary section is a set of "Suggestions for Reflection" to help readers apply that passage in Revelation to their own lives.

Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek

By G.K. Beale, Daniel J. Brendsel, and William A. Ross

Interpretive Lexicon

Publisher's Description: This Interpretive Lexicon has two primary functions aimed at facilitating the exegetical and translational task, namely as a lexicon and also as an interpretive handbook. First, this book lists the vast majority of Greek prepositions, adverbs, particles, relative pronouns, conjunctions, and other connecting words that are notorious for being some of the most difficult words to translate. For each word included, page references are given for several major lexical resources where the user can quickly go to examine the nuances and parameters of the word for translation options. This book will save considerable time for students of the Greek New Testament text. For example, for the Greek preposition en (occurs 2,750 times in the New Testament) covers four pages of small print in the Bauer-Danker Lexicon (BDAG). But Interpretive Lexicon digests those pages in just a few lines, with the page numbers and section references given for A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 3rd Edition (BDAG, 00) and 2nd Edition (BAGD, 79), Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics (Daniel B. Wallace), and Prepositions and Theology in the Greek New Testament (Murray J. Harris). Thus, the translation options can be analyzed quickly. For words with a lower frequency of occurrence and fewer translation options, this book may be sufficient in itself as a lexicon.

Secondly, these prepositions, conjunctions, adverbs, and connecting words in Greek, as in every language, function as explicit discourse-level markers that are essential for ascertaining the main point(s) of a passage. Therefore, this Interpretive Lexicon also evaluates the discourse function(s) of each word that is defined and catalogued, and categorizes its semantic range into defined logical relationships. This feature of the lexicon adds an interpretive element, since translation must include interpretation, at least on a linguistic level. For example, en may be translated in many ways, but those ways are categorized broadly in this book into relationships such as locative (in, among, on), means-end (with, by), grounds (because, on account of), temporal (while, at), and so on. This interpretive feature of the book is tremendously helpful for the exegetical process, allowing for the translator to closely follow the logical flow of the text with greater efficiency. This Interpretive Lexicon is thus a remarkable resource for student, pastor, and scholar alike.